Category: Diabetes

Drug Nutrient Depletion Series: Metformin

Metformin is an antihyperglycemic agent that improves glucose tolerance in patients with Type II Diabetes unable to control blood glucose levels with diet and exercise alone. Metformin is classified as a biguanide, and is sometimes combined with another class of antihyperglycemic medication called sulfonylureas such as glipizide or glyburide. It is also used in the... Read more »
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What is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin is a hormone that is produced by the pancreas that helps cells to absorb glucose in the blood. When we eat a lot of sugar or carbs, there is a rush of glucose (sugar) absorbed into the bloodstream and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin, signaling the cells to allow the sugar in. When... Read more »
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Nutrition to Balance Blood Sugar

by Dr. Masina Wright Low blood sugar is stressful to your body. By eating irregularly over a period of time, you can develop hypoglycemia – a constellation of symptoms including irritability, headaches, dizziness, and weakness that signals your body requires more blood sugar for energy. When these signals are chronically ignored, or are followed with... Read more »
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Happy National Kidney Month!

March is National Kidney Month, and as the largest specialty pharmacy resource for transplant services in Maine, we wanted to send some love and appreciation to our fantastic clients and the local transplant medical community. To address the nation’s critical organ donation shortage and improve the organ matching and placement process, the U.S. Congress passed... Read more »
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Chromium

by Dr. Masina Wright We cannot have a newsletter highlighting skincare without a conversation about acne. IBISWorld, the largest publisher of US industry research, stated in 2011 that the OTC (over the counter) industry for acne treatment manufacturing was forecasted to rise at an annual rate of 3.2% to $2.6 billion through 2014. Proactive, a... Read more »
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Supplements to Help Manage Blood Glucose Levels

When you eat food, your body absorbs the food and turns it into sugar, causing your blood sugar levels, also called blood glucose levels, to rise. Normally, your body releases insulin to combat these increased glucose levels; however, in diabetes, either your body isn’t releasing insulin, or your body isn’t responding to the insulin, causing... Read more »
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